Probably the Worst Kit in the World…

sed30:

True words – you buy a kit of a particular prototype and end more else scratchbuilding!

Originally posted on Max Stafford's Kennel:

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Regular readers of this blog will be aware of the extremely long-running saga of the Caley Jumbo 0-6-0 which occasionally (dis)graces these pages.

After a long and protracted campaign which started at the end of 2009, I have somehow got this thing to a point where it has a chassis with wiper pick-ups that is notionally capable of running under power now, Not withstanding this, for every single bit of forward progress this model makes, there is a violent reaction from it. Every time this happens, I sit and try to work my way to the problem which is why I’ve got to the stage where it is capable (sort of) of running on static test rollers. And so tonight, it runs with all the elegance of a bulldog with a leg missing…

With the body on, it’s still somewhat hesitant to move which I’m happy to put down…

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Further on down the tracks now

sed30:

Always a good read

Originally posted on Max Stafford's Kennel:

While I took the evening off tonight, I continued with sheet 2 of the J27 instructions the previous evening, attaching finer details like the leaf springs and guard irons. Pete devised a rather nice method of mounting these; corresponding holes in the frames and irons. A piece of .45 wire was inserted through each iron, the frames and lastly the opposite iron.
Three holes in total provide solid location whilst the irons are soldered in place. When soldering was
Complete, the wire between the frames was cut and dressed down.
After that I attached the wheels and gave the loco a n

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A little diorama to keep me busy

sed30:

Simples

Originally posted on Loco Yard:

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Locoyard seems to be suffering a bit of a railway modelling drought at the moment, apart from Simon’s excellent exhibition articles, with lots of posts on the big railways. Mr Locoyard himself is still dithering about what to do ;-), so I thought I’d post a bit about a diorama I made to keep me busy and to try out a few things, such as static grass. First off, choose a subject. I’m rubbish at imagining places, so it had to be somewhere real. I chose the approach to Winchcombe station (shown above) with the road over rail bridge as a main feature as I could visit regularly to get photographs to model from. There would also be a small amount of platform to model, some signals and embankment, so lots of interesting stuff in a small space.

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So a start was made, first by hunting for the largest piece…

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Thames Journey (1)

sed30:

Think we got the rough end of the stick with London Bridge but London is full of beautiful buildings

Originally posted on Pete's Favourite Things:

The posts over the coming week are the result of a journey along the River Thames from the city to Greenwich that Sue and I took a couple of weeks ago. We started from London Bridge. This one which replaced the old Bridge in 1973 but is still referred to by many as the new bridge. The bridge it replaced (built 1824-5) was sold and now resides in Arizona USA where I understand it spans a canal.

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The modern London Bridge

London Bridge, Lake Havasu City

The 19th century London bridge in Lake Havasu, Arizona
Phot by cobalt123 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/cobalt/)

One of the more notable buildings at London Bridge is the Shard, opened 2 years ago. It is possible to travel to almost the top and get fantastic views of London from an observation deck.

The Shard

The Shard

Shard Selfie

photo by Nate Edwards (https://www.flickr.com/photos/nate2009/)
The viewing gallery

Hays wharf which stands on southern the river side is a…

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Coalition welfare reforms have FAILED – In figures

sed30:

Failed as we knew they would

Originally posted on SPeye Joe (Welfarewrites):

The Tory-led coalition introduced the Welfare Reform Act with many policies collectively aimed at reducing the Housing Benefit bill by “nearly £2 billion per year by 2014/15″.

The actual HB bill has increased by £2.1 billion above the governments target and so is £4 billion above the ‘inherited’ figure in real terms.

This means that all of the welfare reforms (sic) listed below which all aimed to reduce the HB bill have failed:

  1. LHA cap
  2. LHA increase in SAR age from under 25s to under 35s
  3. LHA freeze in 2012/13 and in 2013/14
  4. Bedroom Tax
  5. Benefit Cap

The DWP said in its magazine called HB Digest published in early July 2010 that:

The Chancellor announced a package of Housing Benefit (HB) reforms in his Budget statement on 22 June. Ministers are clear that the overall cost of HB, forecast to be around £20 billion this financial year, must be controlled…

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Tram loop to cost £25m as Boris ‘panders to developers’

sed30:

Future tramlink developments

Originally posted on Inside Croydon:

The Tramlink loop proposed by London Mayor Boris Johnson, for the benefit of Westfield and Hammerson’s supermall in central Croydon, will cost an eye-watering £25 million.

At least £15 million of that will be paid by London’s tax-payers.

More than 60 trams could be passing East Croydon every hour under expansion plans

Tram usage could double by 2030, according to TfL figures

As Inside Croydon reported last week, the scheme – the first new section since Tramlink opened nearly 15 years ago – is intended to relieve some congestion on the trams, yet will provide considerable inconvenience for tram users compared to the current service, as passengers will have to make multiple changes to continue journeys past East Croydon.

And between them, the Hammersfield shopping mall developers will be expected to pay no more than 40 per cent of the cost of laying the new tracks around this Dingwall Road loop.

The Tramlink network, from Wimbledon to Beckenham Junction, opened in 2000 having…

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